D&D / TTRPGs, Opinion

D&D Character Choices Survey – A Summary

Throughout this month of February we’ve been diving into what we found from data analysis of our Dungeons & Dragons-based survey. This survey launched a year ago in early 2020 and was promoted across social media channels. We received 546 responses in total. The base question of our survey was this: Does personality type affect what kind of character you play in D&D?

The simple answer is yes, based upon this survey alone. But there was so much more to dive into than we thought before. With categorizing questions like diversity, age, and occupation, as well as character-related questions like race, class, and quests, we found so many more interesting correlations. Note that in regards to D&D characters, we asked respondents to talk about the favorite character they’ve ever played.

So now, let’s take a wide overview of the most interesting things we learned, and see what conclusions we can draw about D&D and those who play it.


Personality Types

We analyzed all of the Myers-Briggs personality types against our survey choices. While there were certainly some correlations between types of personalities and character races and classes, that was surprisingly not what stood out the most. Personality types were much more likely to impact the type of quest and conflict the character tackled. And we found out that some personality types are much more likely to play D&D than others.

While you can read all the details in the post here, here is the most interesting finds:

  • The Diplomat personality type group was the most likely to play D&D, with 311/546 respondents. This was followed second by The Analysts, third by The Sentinels, and lastly by The Explorers.
  • INFP Idealist/Mediator types are the most likely to play D&D. Second is INFJ Counselor/Advocate, third is INTJ Mastermind/Architect, and fourth is ENFP Champion/Campaigner.
  • ESTP Doer/Entrepreneur types are the least likely to play D&D, with only 1 respondent.
  • 25% of INFP Mediator character classes are Rogues.
  • 50% of INFJ Counselor characters are on quests of Understanding.
  • 100% of ENTJ Commander characters are females, despite the player genders being varied.

D&D character
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Diversity

The survey next asked respondents to self-identify their gender and race. We had significantly more females and white/Caucasians respond, which leaves the question if these groups are more likely to play D&D, or more likely to frequent the areas where this survey was marketed.

While you can read all the details in the post here, here is the most interesting finds:

  • 47% of female respondents had their characters on quests of Understanding.
  • 40% of agender players played Elf (non-Drow) characters.
  • 29% of the white/Caucasian respondents play Elves or Half-Elves.
  • 45% of Latinx respondents play characters with a Person vs Society conflict.
  • 100% of the Pacific Islander respondents play Warlocks.

Age

We next looked into respondent age and if that affected character choices. Curiously enough, there seems to almost be a journey of types of characters throughout someone’s lifetime. As if, as we evolve and grow, what is important for us to explore in D&D also evolves and grows.

While you can read all the details in the post here, here is an overview of the age groups:

  • Under 18 Players were most likely to play male Elves on quests of Understanding with a Person vs Self conflict.
  • Aged 18 -24 Players were most likely to play females on quests of Understanding with a Person vs Self conflict.
  • Aged 25 – 34 Players were most likely to play females on quests of Understanding with a Person vs Self conflict.
  • Aged 35 – 44 Players were most likely to play females on quests of Understanding with a Person vs Self conflict.
  • Aged 45 – 54 Players were most likely to play females on quests of Understanding with a Person vs Person / Person vs Society conflict evenly matched.
  • Aged 55 – 64 Players were most likely to play male Human Paladins on quests of Transformation with a Person vs the Gods conflict.

It is interesting that the youngest and oldest respondent age group (we had no 65+) were more likely to play male characters and all others were more likely to play female. It’s also interesting up until age 44, players are more focused on quests of Understanding and Person vs Self conflicts. After that, it changes to a Person vs Person and Person vs Society. And beyond that to our oldest group, they are on quests of Transformation in a Person vs the Gods battle.

  • Players aged 25 – 34 years are most likely to play D&D, with 290/546 respondents. Second most likely is 18 – 24, then 35 – 44, 45 – 54, 55 – 64, and Under 18.

Occupation

We offered multiple occupation choices, as well as an “Other” choice. But there weren’t many strong correlations all around. From that you could conclude that the field you go into has little affect on your D&D character choices.

While you can read all the details in the post here, here is the most interesting finds:

  • “Students” were the most likely group to play D&D, with 88/546 respondents. Second was those in the Education field, third was those in the Information Technology field, and fourth was those in Retail.
  • The least likely occupation to play was in Sports, with only one respondent.
  • 30% of players in the Medical field are most likely to play Half-Elves.
  • 41% of players in the General/Skilled Labor field are most likely to play Humans.
  • 47% of those in the Science field are most likely to have characters on quests of Understanding.
  • 41% of Stay at Home Parents have characters on quests of Transformation.
  • 36% of those in the Human Resources field play Druids.
  • 40% of those in the Entertainment industry play characters with a Person vs Self conflict.

D&D character

D&D Character Race

We then dived into the Dungeons & Dragons character-centric questions. Unpacking all the correlations with character race was a good deal of fun! There are definitely some clear preferences. We also had a handful of more unusual races that have only one of two respondents, but it was still exciting to see them represented.

While you can read all the details in the post here, here is the most interesting finds:

  • Half-Elf was the most popular race. Second was Tiefling, third was Human, and fourth was Elf (non-Drow).
  • 35 respondents classified their character race as “Other”. We had no Deep Gnome respondents.
  • We had 1-2 respondents each of Duergar, Orc, Aarakocra, Goblin, Kenku, Kobold, Triton, and Bugbear.
  • Female players held the majority on Half-Elf, Tiefling, Elf, Halfling, Aasimar, Gnome, Drow, Genasi, and Lizardfolk.
  • Male players held the majority on Dwarf, Dragonborn, Half-Orc, Golaith, Firbolg, and Tabaxi.
  • 42% of Half-Elf characters are on quests of Understanding.
  • 45% of Dwarves are played by players aged 35 – 44 years.
  • 41% of Half-Orcs are Barbarians.
  • 25% of Gnomes are Druids.
  • 50% of Goliaths have a Person vs Society conflict.

D&D Character Class

We broke down 5e character classes to see what correlations we could find. It was a fairly good representation of all classes, with not many outliers in terms of respondents.

While you can read all the details in the post here, here is the most interesting finds:

  • Rogue was the most popular class. Second was Cleric, third was Druid, and fourth was Bard.
  • Female players held the majority on Rogue, Cleric, Druid, Ranger, Warlock, Sorcerer, Monk, Paladin, and Blood Hunter.
  • Male players held the majority on Wizard, Barbarian, Fighter, Artificer, and Gunslinger.
  • 57% of Clerics are on quests of Understanding.
  • 81% of Druid characters end up being female, despite 72% of their players being female.
  • 57% of Rangers are either Elves or Half-Elves.
  • 75% of Barbarian characters end up being male, despite 57% of their players being male.
  • 32% of Paladin players are aged 18 – 24 years.
  • 40% of Sorcerers have a Person vs Society conflict.
  • 100% of Fighter players are white/Caucasian.

Quests

There were a small handful of quests that drive D&D characters from their home. Understanding, Transformation, Redemption, and Revenge.

While you can read all the details in the post here, here is the most interesting finds:

  • Quests of Understanding were the most popular, with 248/546 respondents. That was followed by Transformation, Redemption, and lastly Revenge.
  • 41% of characters on quests of Transformation have a Person vs Self conflict.
  • 30% of characters on quests of Redemption are either Elves or Half-Elves.
  • 26% of characters on quests of Revenge are Rogues.

Conflicts

The final question was the type of conflict that was central to the D&D character. Overall though, there really weren’t too many correlations.

While you can read all the details in the post here, here is the most interesting finds:

  • Person vs Self was the most popular conflict, with 144/546 responses. Second was Person vs Society, third was Person vs Person, fourth was Person vs the Gods, fifth was Person vs the Arcane/Technology, and last was Person vs Nature.
  • 31% of characters in a Person vs Person conflict are either Elves or Half-Elves.
  • 55% of characters in a Person vs Nature conflict are male.

D&D character

In Conclusion

In conclusion, it seems fair to say there is a correlation between players, D&D character choices, and everything in between. It was so much fun to dive into all the survey responses, and we are thankful for everyone who took the time to participate. We hope to continue to put out more thought-provoking content like this, perhaps with bigger sample sizes and more in-depth questions. We hope you enjoyed reading all about it!

D&D / TTRPGs, Opinion

Do D&D Character Choices Affect Their Quests & Conflicts?

Part VI: We look into if certain types of characters or players are more likely to have certain internal quests and conflicts.


It was early in 2020 that we posed the question: does your personality type affect what kind of D&D character you play as? Well, after about a year of collecting hundreds of responses, we have analyzed them all and come to some interesting conclusions. Not only about personality, but about player gender, age, ethnicity, and how some character choices correlate to others. This is the sixth in a series of blog posts throughout this month to dive into what we learned, and what it means for the game of Dungeons & Dragons.

The first question in our survey focused on Myers-Briggs personality types. The second and third on self-identified gender and ethnicity. The third and fourth were on age groups and occupation choices. The fifth question was about the race of the respondent’s favorite D&D character they have ever played. The sixth related to character classes. And the seventh and the eight were about internal quests and conflicts. We’ve taken a look at each and analyzed for player data correlations, as well as other character choice correlations. Again, we had 546 respondents for this survey.

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D&D character

Internal Quests

We looked at certain internal quests to see if D&D character choices correlated. We determined internal quests to be what drove the character to go adventuring. Was it a quest of revenge? Was it for understanding? Were they trying to redeem themselves? All these and more were posed as options in our survey.


Quest of Understanding

By far and large this was the most popular internal quest for a character. There were 248 respondents who said the favorite D&D character they have ever played is on a quest of understanding. After all, what better motive to take you from home than to answer deep questions?

  • 25% are INFP Mediator personality types.
  • 56% of the characters are female.
  • 33% have a Person vs Society conflict.

Quest of Transformation

This was our second most popular internal quests, with 139 respondents. You can expect these types of characters to be focused on redefining who they are, leaving old upbringings behind, and seeking a new purpose.

  • 53% of these characters are female.
  • 41% have a Person vs Self conflict.

Quest of Redemption

This was our third most popular internal quest for a D&D character, with 81 respondents. These characters are trying to right a past wrong, or fix a bad mistake.

  • 50% of these characters are male.
  • 30% are either Elves or Half-Elves.
  • 35% have a Person vs Self conflict.

Quest of Revenge

This was our last internal quests, with only 78 respondents. Leaving home to seek vengeance and perhaps vigilante justice, there were also interesting correlations with this quest.

  • 51% of these characters are female.
  • 26% are Rogues.
  • 48% have a Person vs Person conflict.

D&D character

Conflicts

Anyone familiar with story structure (or those who remember school well) will be familiar with types of character conflicts. It always starts with Person vs, and can follow up with Self, Nature, Society, and so on. These typically are key to a character’s backstory, or something critical that evolves in the campaign that the character is passionate about.


Person vs Self

This was our most popular conflict with 161 total respondents. These characters are looking to be at peace with conflict within, and perhaps looking to redeem or transform themselves.

  • 25% of players INFP Mediator personality types.
  • 55% are female characters.

Person vs Society

This was our second most popular conflict, with 144 responses. These characters may feel like outsiders, they may have made enemies, or they may be rebels angry at society.

  • 51% are female characters.
  • 57% are on quests of Understanding.

Person vs Person

This conflict was chosen 119 times. These characters may be out seeking revenge, or have a direct enemy they are up against.

  • 59% of these characters are female.
  • 31% are either Elf or Half-Elf.

Person vs the Gods

We had 72 respondents to this conflict. Why are these characters seeking to battle a god, or many gods? Perhaps they are fighting against a cult, stopping an evil from entering the world, or getting revenge on a god who has wronged them.

  • 54% are female characters.
  • 37% are on a quest of Understanding.

Person vs the Arcane / Technology

We had 32 respondents to this conflict, much less than previous conflicts. These characters are unhappy with magic or technology for a reason. Perhaps it is corrupting life, perhaps it’s being used to hurt others, perhaps they disagree with it.

  • 50% are male characters.
  • 61% are on a quest of Understanding.

Person vs Nature

This was our least most popular choice, with only 18 respondents. Maybe these characters are trying to stop a natural disaster? Maybe they are trying to survive? Maybe they are at war with sentient forces of nature?

  • 55% are male characters.
  • 38% are Humans.

You can read Part I about personality types here. Part II about gender/ethnicity here. Part III about age and occupation here. Part IV about character race here. and Part V about character class here.

We will have a summary post highlighting what we learned, as well as our strongest correlations. That will be posted on February 27th.

D&D / TTRPGs, Opinion

Does D&D Character Class Affect Other Choices?

Part V: We look at D&D character classes and see how that correlates to who plays them and what type of character they are.


It was early in 2020 that we posed the question: does your personality type affect what kind of D&D character you play as? Well, after about a year of collecting hundreds of responses, we have analyzed them all and come to some interesting conclusions. Not only about personality, but about player gender, age, ethnicity, and how some character choices correlate to others. This is the fifth in a series of blog posts throughout this month to dive into what we learned, and what it means for the game of Dungeons & Dragons.

The first question in our survey focused on Myers-Briggs personality types. The second and third on self-identified gender and ethnicity. The third and fourth were on age groups and occupation choices. The fifth question was about the race of the respondent’s favorite D&D character they have ever played. And the sixth related to character class. We’ve taken a look at each D&D character class and analyzed for player data correlations, as well as other character choice correlations. Again, we had 546 respondents for this survey.


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Rogue

Rogue was our most popular class, with an impressive 95 respondents saying their favorite character they’ve ever played was a Rogue. Known for stealth, trap disarming, and sneak attacks, Rogues are also popular across other TTRPG’s and video games.

  • 30% of Rogues are played by INFP Mediator personality types.
  • 58% of Rogues are played by female players and 59% of these characters are female.
  • 32% are on quests of Understanding.

Cleric

Clerics were our second most popular class, with 68 respondents. Known for their devotion to a god, their healing, and versatility in arcane specialties, Clerics make popular party members.

  • 52% of Cleric players are female, and 55% of the characters end up being female.
  • 57% are on quests of Understanding.
  • 35% have a Person vs Self conflict.

D&D character class

Druid

Our third most popular were Druids with 54 respondents. They are able to change form into animals or elementals, and call on nature as their ally.

  • 25% are played by INFJ Counselor personality types.
  • 72% are played by female players and and impressive 81% of their characters end up being female.
  • 55% of Druid players are aged 25 – 34 years.
  • 36% are either Elves or Half-Elves.
  • 51% are on a quest of Understanding.
  • 31% have a Person vs Society conflict.

Bard

Next in line were the Bards with 45 respondents. Entertainers and charmers, Bards have a diverse array of magic to help out a party.

  • 28% of Bards are played by INFP Mediator personality types.
  • 53% of players are aged 25 – 34 years.
  • 29% of them are Tieflings.
  • 51% are on quests of Understanding.
  • 35% have a Person vs Self conflict.

Ranger

There were 43 Ranger respondents. They were tied with Wizards who also have 43 respondents. This class is known for their connection with nature and animals, as well as their excellent tracking and survival ability.

  • 72% of players are female but only 62% of the Ranger characters end up being female.
  • 57% are either Elves or Half-Elves.
  • 46% are on quests of Understanding.
  • 32% have a Person vs Self conflict.

Wizard

Wizards are tied with Rangers for 43 respondents. Wielders of powerful magic, Wizards have multiple specialities they can branch into.

  • 53% of Wizard players are male and 55% of the characters end up being male.
  • 58% of players are aged 25 – 34 years.
  • 27% are Elves.
  • 55% are on quests of Understanding.

Warlock

There were 42 Warlock respondents in our survey. Tied with a patron for magical ability, Warlocks have many memes regarding Eldtrich Blast.

  • 57% of Warlock players are aged 25 – 34 years.
  • 52% of their players are female and 52% of the characters end up being female.
  • 23% of Warlock players are Students.
  • 23% are Tieflings.
  • 52% are on quests of Understanding.
  • 38% have a Person vs Self conflict.

D&D character class

Barbarian

We had 33 Barbarian respondents in our survey. Strong, heavy hitters, Barbarians protect other party members with their ability to take lots of damage and keep fighting.

  • 57% are male players but a staggering 75% of the characters end up being male.
  • 21% are Half-Orcs.
  • 39% are on quests of Transformation.
  • 27% have a Person vs Society conflict.

Sorcerer

Coming in just behind Barbarians, there were 32 Sorcerer responses in our survey. Born with sometimes unruly magic, Sorcerers are a wild card on the battlefield.

  • 30% are played by INFJ Counselor personality types.
  • 59% are female players and 59% of the characters end up being female.
  • 25% of the players are Students.
  • 28% are Half-Elves.
  • 37% are on quests of Understanding.
  • 40% have a Person vs Society conflict.

Monk

There were 30 Monk players in our survey. Dexterous, calm of mind, and with incredible martial arts abilities, Monks use ki points to fuel their abilities.

  • 60% are female players but 50% of the characters end up being female.
  • 56% of players are aged 25 – 34 years.
  • 50% are on quests of Understanding.
  • 33% have a Person vs Society conflict.

Paladin

There were 28 Paladin respondents. Oath-sworn warriors who help others or set out to deliver justice, Paladins are known for heavy armor and impressive weapons.

  • 53% are female players but only 46% of the characters end up being female.
  • 32% of players are aged 18 – 24 years.
  • 25% are Tieflings.
  • 35% are on a quest of Understanding.
  • 35% have a Person vs Society conflict.

Fighter

There were 22 Fighter respondents. With an array of battle-oriented abilities and fighting styles, Fighters are a versatile melee class.

  • 59% of Fighter players are male and 63% of the characters end up being male.
  • 100% of the players are White/ Caucasian.
  • 57% of the players are aged 25 – 34 years.
  • 27% are Humans.
  • 47% are on a quest of Understanding.
  • 36% have a Person vs Society conflict.

D&D Character class

Artificer

There were only four Artificers in our survey, so it is hard to draw a meaningful correlation. Tinkerers and builders, Artificers always have something innovative planned.

  • 50% of players are a INTJ Mastermind personality type.
  • 100% are male players but 50% of the characters ended up being male.
  • 100% of players are aged 25 – 34.
  • 50% said they are of an “Other Race” for their character.
  • 50% are on a quest of Understanding.
  • 50% have a Person vs Society conflict.

Gunslinger

There were only three Gunslingers, so again these results need to be taken with a grain of salt. A class adapted for D&D 5e by Matthew Mercer, Gunslingers wield, obviously, guns.

  • 33% are INFJ Mediator personality types.
  • 66% are male players but 66% of the characters are female.
  • 100% of the players are aged 18 – 24 years.
  • 66% of the players are Students.
  • 66% are on quests of Transformation.
  • 66% have a Person vs Self conflict.

Blood Hunter

There were only three Blood Hunters. Another class recently created by Matthew Mercer, it’s hard to draw any real conclusions with only three responses.

  • 66% of the players are female but 66% of the characters ended up being male.
  • 66% of players work in the Education field.
  • 66% are on a quest of Redemption.

You can read Part I about personality types here. Part II about gender/ethnicity here. Part III about age and occupation here. And Part IV about character race here.

Part VI will be posted February 23rd and will be focused on D&D character conflicts and quests. Sneak peek: quests of Revenge are favored by one class more than others!

D&D / TTRPGs, Opinion

Does D&D Character Race Affect Other Choices?

Part IV: We look into character race choices and see if there is a correlation with other character choices, as well as the types of players that play this race.


It was early in 2020 that we posed the question: does your personality type affect what kind of D&D character you play as? Well, after about a year of collecting hundreds of responses, we have analyzed them all and come to some interesting conclusions. Not only about personality, but about player gender, age, ethnicity, and how some character choices correlate to others. This is the fourth in a series of blog posts throughout this month to dive into what we learned, and what it means for the game of Dungeons & Dragons.

The first question in our survey focused on Myers-Briggs personality types. The second and third on self-identified gender and ethnicity. The third and fourth were on age groups and occupation choices. The fifth question was about the race of the respondent’s favorite D&D character they have ever played. We’ve taken a look at each character race and analyzed for player data correlations, as well as other character choice correlations. Again, we had 546 respondents for this survey.


Half-Elf

This was our most popular race, with 85 total respondents. It is easy to tell why this would be an attractive race to play. Generally regarded as a mix between Huma and Elven blood, you get some of the best of both worlds.

  • 25% are played by INFP Mediator types.
  • 67% are played by female players, and 65% of these Half-Elf characters end up being female.
  • 57% are played by players aged 25 – 34 years.
  • 42% are on quests of Understanding.
  • 32% have a Person vs Self conflict.

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Tiefling

Tieflings were our second most popular race, with 74 respondents playing Tieflings. With ancestry from the Nine Hells that often gives them horns and a tail (among other features), Tieflings can definitely be a lot of fun to dive into.

  • 64% of players are female, and 58% of these characters end up being female.
  • 51% of player ages are 25 – 34 years.
  • 44% are on quests of Understanding.
  • 31% are in a Person vs Society conflict.

D&D character

Human

Humans were tied for third most popular along with Elves, with 73 respondents. It can be fun to play an ordinary person in an extraordinary world!

  • 25% are played by INFP Mediators.
  • 50% are played by players aged 25 – 34 years.
  • 42% are on quests of Understanding.
  • 27% are in a Person vs Person conflict.

Elf

With 73 total responses, this category encompassed High Elves, Wood Elves, and other newer subraces of Elves. Drow are excluded from this category.

  • 58% of the players are female but 64% of the characters end up being female.
  • 42% of players are aged 25 – 34 years.
  • 47% are on quests of Understanding.
  • 34% have a Person vs Self conflict.

Halfling

With 33 total respondents, Halflings are a significant drop down from the most popular races.

  • 75% of the players are female and 75% of the characters are female.
  • 66% are played by players aged 25 – 34 years.
  • 30% are Rogues.
  • There is a tie for internal quests, with 39% on a quest of Understanding and another 39% on a quest of Transformation.
  • 34% are in a Person vs Society conflict.


Aasimar

Aasimar was next in line with 27 respondents. Aasimar are a race born with celestial blood.

  • 70% of their players are female but only 62% of the characters are female.
  • 51% of players are aged 25 – 34 years.
  • 33% are Clerics.
  • 59% are on quests of Understanding.
  • 37% have a Person vs Self conflict.

Gnome

There were 24 Gnome players within our survey.

  • 33% are played by INFJ Counselor types.
  • 66% are played by female players and 58% of the characters are female.
  • 66% are played by players aged 25 – 34 years.
  • 25% are Druids.
  • 58% are on quests of Understanding.
  • 41% are in a Person vs Self conflict.

Dwarf

There were 21 respondents who play Dwarves. This is one of the races that often get stereotyped into being a certain way.

  • 28% are played by INFJ Counselors.
  • 52% are played by male players and 52% of the characters end up being male.
  • 45% of the players are aged 35 – 44 years.
  • 38% are Clerics.
  • 33% are in a Person vs Person conflict.

D&D character

Dragonborn

With the ability to blow breath weapons and a scaly appearance, Dragonborn had 17 respondents.

  • 64% have male players and 70% of the characters are male.
  • There was a tie for top age group, with 41% being 18 – 24 years and another 41% being 25 – 34 years.
  • 41% are played by Students.
  • 29% are Paladins.
  • 47% are on quests of Understanding.

Half-Orc

Tied with Dragonborn, Half-Orcs had another 17 respondents for a D&D character.

  • 25% are played by ENFP Champion types.
  • 58% of their players are male but 70% of the characters end up being male.
  • 52% of players are aged 25 – 34 years.
  • 41% are Barbarians.

Goliath

Typically tall and strong, Goliaths had 12 respondents.

  • 27% are played by INFJ Counselors.
  • 50% are male players and 58% of the characters end up being male.
  • 50% of players are aged 25 – 34 years.
  • 33% of the players are Students.
  • 41% are Barbarians.
  • 58% are on quests of Understanding.
  • 50% have a Person vs Society conflict.

Drow

With another 12 respondents, Drow or Dark Elves are next in line.

  • 33% are played by INFP Mediators.
  • 75% are played by female players, but the genders are evenly split between male and female for characters.
  • Player age groups are tied with 41% aged 25 – 34 and another 41% aged 35 – 44.
  • 33% are Rogues.
  • 41% are in a Person vs Self conflict.

Genasi

With ties to elemental planes, we had 10 Genasi in the survey.

  • 60% are played by INFP Mediator types.
  • 60% of the players are female and 60% of the characters are female.
  • 50% of players are aged 18 – 24.
  • 40% of the players are Students.
  • 30% are Druids.
  • 50% are on quests of Understanding.
  • 30% have a Person vs Person conflict.

Firbolg

Relatively new to 5e, there were nine Firbolgs.

  • 44% are played by INFP Mediator types.
  • 66% are played by male players and 66% of the characters are male.
  • 100% of the players are aged 25 – 34.
  • 44% are Clerics.

Tabaxi

Cat-like and graceful, there were eight Tabaxi respondents.

  • 37% are played by INFP Mediator types.
  • 62% are played by male players and 62% of the characters are male.
  • 50% of players are aged 25 – 34.
  • 37% are Rogues.
  • 75% are on quests of Understanding.
  • 50% are in a Person vs Society conflict.

D&D character

Lizardfolk

There were only six Lizardfolk in our survey.

  • 50% are played by INFP Mediator types.
  • 66% are played by female players and 60% of the characters end up being female.
  • 83% of players are aged 25 – 34.
  • 50% are Druids.
  • 83% are on quests of Understanding.

Bugbear

We had only two D&D character Bugbears in the survey.

  • One was played by a male ENFP Champion type aged 25 – 34 years and working in the Education field. The character is a male Paladin on a quest of Understanding with a Person vs Self conflict.
  • The second was played by a male ENFP Champion type aged 35 – 44 years and working in the Financial Services field. The character is a male Sorcerer on a quest of Transformation in a Person vs Self conflict.

Triton

There was only one Triton respondent.

  • The Triton was played by a male ENTJ Commander type aged 25 – 34 years with an “Other” occupation. The Triton is a male Cleric on a quest of Understanding with a Person vs Society conflict.

Kobold

There was only one Kobold respondent.

  • The Kobold was played by a female INTJ Inspector type aged 25 – 34 years with an “Other” occupation. The Kobold is a gender nonconforming Warlock on a quest of Understanding with a Person vs Society conflict.

Kenku

We had only one Kenku respondent.

  • The Kenku was played by a INFP Mediator respondent who marked their gender as “Other”. They are aged 25 – 34 years and have an “Other” occupation. The Kenku is a female Rogue on a quest of Understanding with a Person vs Person conflict.

Goblin

We had only one Goblin respondent.

  • The Goblin was played by a female ISFJ Defender type aged 25 – 34 years with an “Other” occupation. The Goblin is a female Monk on a quest of Transformation in a Person vs Society conflict.

Aarakocra

There was one Aarakocra respondent.

  • The Aarakocra was played by a male INTP Thinker type aged 35 – 44 years in the Financial Services field. The character is a male Monk on an quest of Understanding in a Person vs Society conflict.

Orc

There was one Orc respondent.

  • The Orc was played by a male ISTJ Inspector type aged 35 – 44 years in the Science field. The Orc is a male Monk on a quest of Redemption with a Person vs Self conflict.

Duergar

There was one Duergar respondent.

  • The Duergar was played by a male ISFP Composer type aged 25 – 34 years in the Writing/Editing field. The Duergar is a female Ranger on a quest of Understanding with a Person vs the Gods conflict.

Deep Gnome

There were no Deep Gnome respondents.


Other

There were 35 respondents that marked their D&D character race as “Other”.


You can read Part I about personality types here. Part II about gender/ethnicity here. And Part III about age and occupation here.

Part V will be posted February 19th and will be focused on D&D character classes and the choices that went along with that class. Sneak peek: one musical class is 29% Tiefling!

D&D / TTRPGs, Opinion

Does your Age & Occupation Affect Your D&D Character Choices?

Part III: We dive into age groups and occupation responses to see if that affects D&D character choices.

It was early in 2020 that we posed the question: does your personality type affect what kind of D&D character you play as? Well, after about a year of collecting hundreds of responses, we have analyzed them all and come to some interesting conclusions. Not only about personality, but about player gender, age, ethnicity, and how some character choices correlate to others. This is the third in a series of blog posts throughout this month to dive into what we learned, and what it means for the game of Dungeons & Dragons.

The first question in our survey focused on Myers-Briggs personality types. The second and third on self-identified gender and ethnicity. Our third and fourth were on age groups and occupation choices. We asked responders to put their age group, and then to choose which field they work in. We have then analyzed these responses with our D&D character-based questions to see if there are any patterns. And there definitely are! Again, we had 546 respondents for this survey.


D&D character

Age

The most interesting thing about the age groups is taken as a whole. There seems to be a journey of life gone through in D&D character choices. While mostly there aren’t patterns in races or classes except for a few instances, there are definitely patterns in the types of quests these characters are taken on.


Under 18

There were ten respondents that said they are aged 18 or under. For this group, you would expect high school or middle school students, and rarely some college students. The teenage years are definitely big times of change and choices within our lives, and this group seems to have some clear preferences when it comes to the types of characters they play.

  • 55% played male characters.
  • 50% played Elves.
  • 40% of their characters are on quests of Understanding.
  • 40% of their characters are in a Person vs Self conflict.

18 – 24

We had 100 respondents claim to be from this age group. This is a big transformational time in all of our lives. We start to make decisions on who we are and who we want to be. Some may go to college, some may travel the world, some may start their careers, some might get married, some might have children. For this group, we see our responders are still interested in characters with quests of Understanding in a Person vs Self conflict. But we also see a marked shift in character gender.

  • 50% of their characters are female.
  • 40% are on quests of Understanding.
  • 32% have a Person vs Self conflict.

25 – 34

This was by far our biggest group of respondents, with 290 total. Does this mean this group is more likely to play D&D, or more likely to frequent the social media channels this survey was marketed on? What can you expect from people in this age group? It is definitely diverse. There could be college students, stay at home parents, career professionals, free spirits, or those still figuring out what they want. But they do have some clear D&D choices.

  • 55% of their characters are female.
  • 48% of their characters are on quests of Understanding.
  • 29% of their characters are in a Person vs Self conflict.

35 – 44

This age group had 95 total respondents. At this point in their lives, people have either committed to a career path or are reinventing themselves and trying a new direction. Some may have gotten married, others stayed single. Some may have children and others opted for childfree. Some might be thriving with the “over the hill” age and others stressed about it. Life is diverse for everyone, after all. We continue to see a similar pattern against the last two age groups. But most notably is that the Person vs Self conflict has steadily declined, and this is the lowest we’ve seen it while still holding a majority of the responses.

  • 55% play female characters.
  • 41% of their characters are on quests of Understanding.
  • 28% have a Person vs Self character conflict.

45 – 54

We had 25 respondents in this age group. Does this mean as people age they are less likely to play D&D? Or does it mean this age group was less likely than others to frequent the social media channels this survey was marketed on? In this “middle-aged” group, people are at a variety of points in their lives. Preparing for retirement, or preparing for new projects in their senior years. Perhaps grandchildren, perhaps childfree. Perhaps world travel, perhaps comfort at home.

But with this group this is the first time we’ve seen a break from a Person vs Self conflict. Now it is evenly divided with Person vs Person and Person vs Society. Why is this? Perhaps at this point in their lives people have a solid identity of self and are focused outward more? Maybe they’re fed up with society, or other people in general (understandable). Whatever the reason, it is a very interesting change.

  • 52% play female characters.
  • 56% are on quests of Understanding.
  • There is a tie for top spot with 36% in a Person vs Person conflict and another 36% in a Person vs Society conflict.

55 – 64

There are only five respondents in this age group. With some retiring but all looking ahead to their senior years, this group had a marked change from others before it. There were clear preferences for character race and class, as well as a break from internal character quests and a new preferred conflict. While this is a small sampling so it’s hard to draw solid conclusions, it is extremely interesting to see such a difference.

  • 80% play male characters.
  • 40% play Human characters.
  • 40% play the Paladin class.
  • 80% are on quests of Transformation.
  • 40% are in a Person vs the Gods conflict.

65+

We had no respondents for this age group.


D&D Character

Occupation

The next question dealt with respondents’ occupation. We had 19 choices including an “Other” option. And there definitely are some interesting finds!


Student

This was our biggest group, with 88 respondents. Perhaps because that tends to be a more social environment and so these respondents are more likely to play D&D? Students would be anyone in middle school, high school, undergraduate, or graduate school.

  • 39% of their characters are on quests of Understanding.
  • 30% have a Person vs Self conflict.

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Education

Our next biggest group was the Education field, with 78 respondents. In this group you can expect teachers, professors, school administrators, and professional trainers.

  • 39% of their characters are on quests of Understanding.
  • 29% of their characters have a Person vs Society conflict.

Information Technology

IT was our third biggest group, with 47 respondents. A broad field, you can expect anyone across computer engineering, support desks, UX / UI designers, development, and everyone in between.

  • 38% of their characters are on quests of Understanding.
  • 34% are in a Person vs Person conflict.

Retail

We had 33 respondents in the retail field. While many are likely on-the-floor customer service focused roles, there also could be store managers, retail trainers, and even senior leadership within the corporations.

  • 45% of their characters are on quests of Understanding.
  • 39% are in a Person vs Self conflict.

Medical

There were 26 respondents in the medical field. Also a broad field, this could be nurses, x-ray techs, healthcare administrators, medical assistants, and many more. While one might automatically assume they’d play a healing-based class like Cleric, there actually wasn’t a class correlation at all and Cleric was only 15% of responses.

  • 30% play Half-Elves.
  • 53% are on quests of Understanding.
  • 50% have a Person vs Self conflict.

General or Skilled Labor

There were 24 respondents for this category that includes electricians, warehouse workers, plumbers, carpenters, and all other hands-on professionals.

  • 41% play a Human character.
  • 33% are on quests of Understanding.
  • There was a tie for conflict. 25% have a Person vs Self conflict, while another 25% have a Person vs the Gods conflict.

Science

There are 21 respondents in the science field. Researchers, chemists, engineers, biologists . . . this is a varied field. While there were no race or class preferences, there were preferences for quests and conflict.

  • 47% are on quests of Understanding.
  • 42% are in a Person vs Self conflict.

Artist

We had 19 Artist respondents. Painters, designers, digital drawers, there are many wonderful artists out there making our world colorful.

  • 26% play Human characters.
  • 57% are on quests of Understanding.
  • 42% are in a Person vs Self conflict.

Financial Services

Tied with Artists, we had 19 Financial Services respondents. This would encompass those involved in banking, investments, and even front line customer service professionals within banks.

  • 68% are on quests of Understanding.
  • 31% are in a Person vs Society conflict.

Writer / Editor

There were 18 Writers and Editors in our survey. Authors, journalists, poets, those involved with publishing houses . . . all fall within this category.

  • 33% have characters on quests of Transformation.
  • 27% have a Person vs Society conflict.

Hospitality

We had 17 respondents that work in the Hospitality industry. Event planners, venue managers, hotel workers, all of these fall within Hospitality.

  • 29% play Half-Elves.
  • 52% are on quests of Understanding.
  • There was a tie for top place in conflict. 29% are in a Person vs Person conflict and another 29% are in a Person vs Society conflict.

Entertainment

There were 16 responses from the Entertainment industry. Performers, dancers, singers, actors, and everyone working for production are all in this field.

  • 25% play Tieflings.
  • 31% play Rogues.
  • 37% are on quests of Understanding.
  • 40% have a Person vs Self conflict.

Marketing

There were 14 people in Marketing for our survey. Those that create brand identity, start promotional campaigns, and research into consumer behavior all fall within Marketing.

  • 28% play Half-Elves.
  • 28% play Warlocks.
  • 71% are on quests of Understanding.
  • 28% have a Person vs Person conflict.

Stay at Home Parent

We had 12 stay at home fathers or mothers that took the survey.

  • 33% play Rogues.
  • 41% are on a quest of Transformation.
  • 33% have a Person vs Self conflict.

Human Resources

There were 11 HR responses within this survey. Recruiters, payroll specialists, employee relations, and benefits administrators all fall within HR. This is especially interesting because I (Ashley or Tal) used to be in HR as a Recruiter. And when I was in the industry, my first D&D character was a Wood Elf Druid on a quest of Understanding. Although I’ve moved out of that industry into writing now and have created a new D&D character that I would deem my favorite, it’s interesting to note that I would have been one of these respondents.

  • 27% play Elves.
  • 36% play Druids.
  • 45% are on quests of Understanding.
  • 45% have a Person vs the Gods conflict.

Legal Services

There were only six responses from the Legal Services field. It is interesting to wonder why. Perhaps, we we noted in Part I of this series of posts, certain personality types are less likely to play D&D. Attorneys, legal assistants, legal researchers, and mediators are all within this industry.

  • 50% play Tieflings.
  • 50% play Rangers.
  • 50% are on quests of Transformation.
  • There was a tie for top conflict. 33% are in a Person vs Society conflict. Another 33% are in a Person vs Person conflict.

Sports

We had only 1 respondent from the Sports industry.

  • This respondent plays a Human Paladin on a quest of Revenge with a Person vs Person conflict.

General / Misc Business

We had another category for business positions that don’t fall under anything listed above. This had 15 responses.

  • 66% are on quests of Understanding.
  • 33% have a Person vs Person conflict.

Other

We allowed an Other category that had an impressive 81 responses.

  • 50% are on quests of Understanding.
  • 30% have a Person vs Society conflict.

You can read Part I about D&D character and associated personality types here. And Part II about gender/ethnicity here.

Part IV will be posted February 15th and will be focused on D&D character races and the choices that went along with that race. Sneak peek: one unusual race is 50% Druid!

D&D / TTRPGs, Opinion

Does Your Diversity Affect Your D&D Character Choices?

Part II: We look at ethnicity and gender responses and see how that correlates to D&D choices.

It was early in 2020 that we posed the question: does your personality type affect what kind of D&D character you play as? Well, after about a year of collecting hundreds of responses, we have analyzed them all and come to some interesting conclusions. Not only about personality, but about player gender, age, ethnicity, and how some character choices correlate to others. This is the second in a series of blog posts throughout this month to dive into what we learned, and what it means for the game of Dungeons & Dragons.

While the first question in our survey revolved around Myers-Briggs personality types, the second and third were diversity-related questions. We asked responders to self-identify their ethnicity and gender. When looking at these responses compared to the D&D-based choices asked further along in the survey, there are some interesting patterns.

Please note that we had 545 responses total for these questions. While for some groups there were hundreds of responses, others were less than ten. For smaller groups, it is harder to determine true correlations. But patterns are worth noting just for interest’s sake!


D&D character

Gender


Females

We had a staggering 305 self-identified females. Does this mean that females are more likely to play D&D, or more active on the social media channels where this survey was marketed? It is an interesting question.

Here are the trends we saw in female respondents.

  • 47% had their characters on quests of Understanding.
  • 32% had their characters in a Person vs Self conflict.

Males

There were 189 self-identified male respondents, nearly half the female amount. Here are the trends we saw in male respondents.

  • 39% of their characters are on quests of Understanding.
  • 26% of their characters are in a Person vs Society conflict.

Gender Nonconforming

We had 22 respondents self-identify as gender nonconforming.

  • 40% of their characters are female.
  • 54% of their characters are on quests of Understanding.
  • 40% of their characters are in a Person vs Society conflict.

Transgender

We had 11 respondents self-identify as transgender.

  • The genders of their characters were split for top spot with 36% playing females and another 36% playing transgender characters.
  • 36% play Tieflings.
  • Their character classes were evenly split for top spot with 27% playing Warlocks and 27% playing Rogues.
  • Their internal character quests were also evenly split for top spot with 45% on quests of Transformation and another 45% on quests of Understanding.
  • 45% of their characters are in a Person vs Self conflict.

Agender

Only 10 of our respondents self-identified as agender.

  • 40% of their characters are male.
  • 40% of their characters are Elves.
  • Classes were tied for top spot, with 30% playing Clerics and another 30% playing Rogues.
  • 80% are on quests of Understanding.
  • 30% have a Person vs Self conflict.

Other

There were eight respondents that chose the “Other” option on the survey.

  • 50% had gender nonconforming characters.
  • 37% played Tieflings.
  • Classes were split for top place with 25% playing Barbarians and another 25% playing Rogues.
  • 37% of their characters are on quests of Understanding.
  • 50% of their characters have a Person vs Society conflict.

D&D character

Ethnicity


White / Caucasian

We had 482 of our respondents identify as White / Caucasian. Again we must pose the question if this means this group is more likely to play D&D, or simply more likely to frequent the social media spaces where this survey was posted.

  • 29% played either Elves or Half-Elves.
  • 45% had characters on quests of Understanding.
  • 29% had characters in a Person vs Self conflict.

Latinx

We had 22 respondents identify as Latinx.

  • 50% of their characters are on quests of Understanding.
  • 45% of their characters have Person vs Society conflicts.

Asian

There were 21 respondents that identify with Asian ethnicity.

  • 61% of their characters are male despite only 28% of the players being male.
  • 23% play Humans.
  • 23% play Rogues.
  • Internal character quests were evenly split for top place with 28% on quests of Understanding and another 28% on quests of Redemption.
  • 52% of their characters have a Person vs Self conflict.

African

We had only four respondents identify as African.

  • 50% play Dragonborn characters.
  • 50% play Rogues.
  • 50% are on quests of Revenge.
  • 50% are in a Person vs the Gods conflict.

Native / Indigenous

There were only four respondents that identify as Native / Indigenous.

  • 50% play Monks.
  • 75% are on quests of Understanding.
  • 50% have a Person vs the Gods conflict.

Pacific Islander

Only three respondents identify as Pacific Islander.

  • 100% play Warlocks.
  • 66% are on quests of Understanding.
  • 100% are in a Person vs Self conflict.

Middle Eastern

There was only one Middle Eastern respondent.

  • This one respondent plays a male Barbarian on a quest of Transformation with a Person vs Society conflict. They marked their character race as “other”.

Other

There were six of our respondents that chose “Other” as their ethnicity.

  • 33% play Warlocks.
  • Internal quests were split for top spot with 33% on quests of Understanding and another 33% on quests of Transformation.
  • Conflicts were also split for top spot with 33% having a Person vs Society Conflict and another 33% having a Person vs the Gods conflict.

You can see Part I of our survey revolving around personality types here.

Part III will be posted on February 11th. It will focus on respondent age groups and occupation and how that affects D&D character choices. Sneak peek: one group is 40% Human Paladin!

Character Tips, D&D / TTRPGs

Does Your Personality Affect Your D&D Character Choices?

Part 1: We examine personality profiles and D&D choices.

It was early in 2020 that we posed the question: does your personality type affect what kind of D&D character you play as? Well, after about a year of collecting hundreds of responses, we have analyzed them all and come to some interesting conclusions. Not only about personality, but about player gender, age, ethnicity, and how some character choices correlate to others. This is the first in a series of blog posts throughout this month to dive into what we learned, and what it means for the game of Dungeons & Dragons.

Our first question was based around Myers-Briggs personality types. We analyzed those profiles against choices for character race, class, and quests. Not only did we find interesting data on that front, but also we uncovered something else. It seems certain types of personalities are more likely to play D&D than others. With a total of 542 respondents to this question, let’s first look at what personality types responded.

INFP – Idealist / Mediator 125 Creative. Emotional. Daydreamers.
INFJ – Counselor / Advocate 102 Imaginative. Sensitive. Insightful.
INTJ – Mastermind / Architect 67 Determined. Critical. Rational.
ENFP – Champion / Campaigner 57 Curious. Overthinking. Energetic.
INTP – Thinker / Logician 38Open-minded. Withdrawn. Original.
ISFJ – Defender / Nurturer 28 Observant. Shy. Supportive.
ENFJ – Giver / Protagonist 27 Charismatic. Indecisive. Tolerant.
ISFP – Composer / Adventurer 23 Artistic. Noncommittal. Charming.
ENTP – Visionary / Debater 21 Smart. Intolerant. Enthusiastic.
ISTJ – Inspector / Logistician 15 Calm. Stubborn. Responsible.
ENTJ – Commander 12 Inspiring. Impatient. Efficient.
ISTP – Craftsman / Virtuoso 9Spontaneous. Easily Bored. Relaxed.
ESFJ – Provider / Consul 8Social. Difficulty Improvising. Loyal.
ESFP – Performer / Entertainer 5 Bold. Unfocused. Witty.
ESTJ – Supervisor / Executive 4 Organized. Inflexible. Honest.
ESTP – Doer / Entrepreneur 1 Direct. Insensitive. Perceptive.

The Diplomats – INFP, INFJ, ENFP, & ENFJ

The first quarter we’ll break down is The Diplomats. As we can see from the table above, this is the type most likely to play D&D. So why is this? And what choices do they make in their characters?

With 542 responses to this question, a staggering 311 of them are of this personality group. From this we can assume that this personality type is most likely to play D&D, or most likely to be involved in online communities where this survey was marketed. The Myers-Briggs personality test lumps these four into the same category based on similar qualities. Diplomats tend to be empathetic, good communicators, and passionate about whatever they dedicate themselves to. All these are great traits for role-playing games!


INFP – Idealist / Mediator

This type is the most likely to play D&D, with 125 total responses. It is no wonder then that I (Ashley or Tal) love the game so much since that is my personality, as well! Mediators are highly empathetic and feel other’s pain as if it was their own. They are more likely than any other personality type to enjoy fantasy, and are highly likely to be fiction authors, poets, or work in the performing arts. All this lends itself very well to the creative and character-driven settings of D&D. Their love of creativity and storytelling helps to offset Mediator’s often reserved and self-conscious tendencies.

When looking at the choices Mediator’s made in our survey, there were some clear preferences.

  • 25% of their characters are Rogues.
  • 48% of their characters are on internal quests of Understanding.
  • 32% of their characters have a Person vs Self conflict.

INFJ – Counselor / Advocate

This is the second most likely type to play D&D, with 102 respondents. Advocates are very insightful, creative, and compassionate. They prefer jobs where they can help others, and tend to have big dreams outside of daily routines. This makes them adept at creating and role-playing characters, especially those that enjoy helping NPC’s and other PC’s. Even though Advocates are quieter and often need to be alone to recharge, their imaginations will bring them back to the table.

  • 50% of the characters Advocates play are on quests of Understanding.
  • 31% of their characters centered on a Person vs Society conflict.

ENFP – Champion / Campaigner

This personality type was the fourth most likely to play D&D, with 57 respondents. What makes Champions drawn to this game? For starters, they are very people-focused. Outgoing, energetic, and endlessly curious, they have big personalities that they bring to the table that makes them instantly likeable. Champions see life as a network of emotions, relationships, and deeper meanings. This makes them fun role-players during D&D. Their tendency to overthink things and get emotional can become a benefit in D&D, allowing them to analyze NPC interactions and become invested in quests.

  • 36% of their characters are on a quest of Understanding.
  • 31% of their characters on involved in a Person vs Person conflict.

ENFJ – Giver / Protagonist

This personality type is much less likely to play D&D than other Diplomats, with only 27 responders. Why might this be? Protagonists are natural-born leaders, caring, and creative. However, Protagonists also have trouble making decisions, and tend to burn out quickly in environments that demand a high amount of situational awareness. This is perhaps why we are less likely to find these otherwise social people at the gaming table.

  • 51% of their character are male, despite only 44% of ENFJ respondents being male.
  • 40% of their characters are on a quest of Understanding.
  • Two conflicts were tied for dominance with 29% of responses a piece. Person vs Self, and Person vs Person.

The Analysts – INTJ, ENTJ, INTP, & ENTP

This one definitely surprised me. Analysts are the second most likely group to play D&D, with 138 total respondents. While not known for their artistry or charisma, Analysts as a group are rational, smart, and impartial. Perhaps the side of D&D they are drawn to is the strategic side, then. The planning ahead, the optimizing character sheets, and the machinations behind villainous plots. While Diplomats bring their hearts into the game, Analysts bring their minds.


INTJ – Mastermind / Architect

Not only are Masterminds the most likely of the Analysts to play D&D, they are also the third most likely over all to play, with 67 respondents. No goal is too big for a Mastermind, and they love to dive into books to learn more and more. You can be certain this player will know the Player’s Handbook (and all the other books) inside out and will be fully committed to any quest that is tackled. Especially complex quests that require good notetaking, in-game research, and a Sherlock vs Moriarty-style conflict. Masterminds enjoy being around other like-minded people. So if they can find a group that values their intellect, that will overrule their less social tendencies that can make them come across as critical or arrogant.

  • 44% of their characters are on a quest of Understanding.
  • 37% of their characters have a Person vs Self conflict.

ENTJ – Commander

Commander types are very unlikely to play D&D it seems, with only 12 respondents. Why is this? They are charismatic, accomplishment-driven, and strategic. But Commanders tend to struggle with interacting with people and aren’t the best at displaying or identifying complex emotions. This could be why role-play isn’t their first go-to. But for those that do play, the game table gets a strong-willed player that can easily lead teams and facilitate quests. Note that since we have only 12 Commanders from the survey, that is not an ideal amount for getting great data. But even with 12 we did see some preferences worth noting, with a grain of salt.

  • 100% played female characters, despite less than half being female players.
  • 50% of them played Clerics.
  • 75% of their characters were on quests of Understanding.
  • 50% of their characters were in a Person vs the Gods conflict.

INTP – Thinker / Logician

We had 38 responders be Thinkers, making them the 5th most likely to play D&D. So what drives them to play, and why do more not join in? Thinkers have busy minds, creative reasoning, and are always looking for logical solutions. This makes them great problem-solvers at the gaming table, especially when dungeon delving. But they are not big rule followers, and their logical way of communicating can have them come across as unemotional or condescending. This could be what keeps most of them away from tables were the majority of players are the emotionally-driven Diplomats.

  • 36% of them play Half-Elves.
  • 28% of them play Rogues.
  • 50% of them are on a quest of Understanding.
  • 34% of them have a Person vs Self character conflict.

ENTP – Visionary / Debater

Only 21 Debaters responded to the survey. A “devil’s advocate” type, Debaters are intellectual brain-stormers and highly confident. These are great players to solve in-game problems, tackle political intrigue, and have battles of the mind with villains. However, their love for debate can come across as argumentative and can easily cross boundaries, which can make it difficult for them to make friends at the table or build in-game relationships.

  • 28% of their characters are Human.
  • 24% play Rogues.
  • Two quests were tied at 28% a piece. A quest of Transformation, and a quest of Redemption.
  • 33% are in a Person vs Society conflict.

The Sentinels – ISTJ, ISFJ, ESTJ, & ESFJ

The Sentinel group is third most likely to play D&D, with 55 respondents. Sentinels are extremely practical, orderly, and reliable. Typically warm and caring individuals, it is interesting to see so little in a game that is focused on relationships. Given that we have so little data for these personalities, it is important to take correlations with a grain of salt as you truly need a bigger number to make more solid conclusions.


ISTJ – Inspector / Logistician

Only 15 Inspectors were in the survey. Highly logical and dutiful, Inspectors are steadfast rule followers. They are also slow to make friends as they tend not to be talkative or spontaneous. While this is likely the reason they aren’t as active with D&D, those that do find a group they’re comfortable with will make excellent players for the more numbers and strategy-driven side of the game.

  • 40% have their characters are on quests of Understanding.
  • 33% have a Person vs Self conflict.

ISFJ – Defender / Nurturer

There were 28 Defender respondents. Defenders make an excellent addition to any D&D group. They are warm, unassuming, supportive, and observant. They are sure to support the party’s objectives, give solid input on quests, and get along with everyone in the group. So why do we see so little Defenders here? Perhaps it is because these personality types tend to be humble, shy, and stay away from the spotlight. But when they get noticed for a group, they are sure to make a valuable asset.

  • 57% of their characters are female, even though 64% of the Defenders are female.
  • 53% are on quests of Understanding.
  • 42% of them have a Person vs Society conflict.

ESTJ – Supervisor / Executive

Only four of our respondents are Supervisors, making them extremely rare to play D&D. Advisors and leaders that are heavily involved in community, Supervisors tend to focus on tradition and routine. While this community-oriented mindset makes them great to discover D&D groups, they also are a type very worried about public opinion. And since D&D, to some, can still seem unusual, this may turn them away.

  • 50% played Clerics.
  • 75% are on a quest of Understanding.
  • 50% have a Person vs the Gods conflict.

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ESFJ – Provider / Consul

There were eight Providers in the survey, making them also very rare to play D&D. They are people-focused, community-driven, and are comfortable in the spotlight. They tend to get along very well with others and be quite popular. It may seem surprising, then, that they are not more active in D&D. But this is another type worried about public opinion and social status, which can drive them away from games like D&D. Providers also rarely leave their comfort zones.

  • 37% played Halflings.
  • Both Bard and Fighter were tied for top spot, with 25% a piece.
  • 71% are on quests for Understanding.
  • 37% have a Person vs Self conflict.

The Explorers – ISTP, ISFP, ESFP, & ESTP

At first it can seem quite surprising that Explorers are the least likely to play D&D, with only 38 overall. They are creative, spontaneous, and flexible. But there are other traits that war with their creative tendencies, which may be what dissuades them from the table. As with the Defenders, please keep in mind that since we have such low responses it is hard to gauge a real correlation. But what we did find is interesting and worth doing more research at a later date.


ISTP – Craftsman / Virtuoso

Nine Craftsman responded to our survey. Craftsman types are inquisitive, goal-setters, and love to build things. They are friendly and believe in being sensitive to others’ thoughts and feelings. So why don’t we see them more often in D&D? Craftsman types dislike commitment and are bored easily. If they are not truly in love with D&D, they will not show up. And since D&D can be very “theater of the mind”, this may be not as fun for these types that like to play with their hands.

  • 33% played Human characters.
  • 55% were on quests of Understanding.
  • Person vs Self and Person vs Person conflicts were split with 33% a piece.

ISFP – Composer / Adventurer

With 23 respondents, Adventurers were the most likely of the Explorers to play D&D. It is no surprise then that our own DM (Scott or Ru) is an ISFP type! Open-minded, extremely artistic, and social, Adventurers tend to get along well with everyone. The creative outlet of D&D is excellent for Adventurers. However, they dislike planning and can struggle with self-esteem. This might be why there aren’t as many committing to D&D campaigns and putting themselves in the spotlight.

  • 26% played Tieflings.
  • 47% are on quests of Understanding.
  • 26% have a Person vs Society conflict.

ESFP – Performer / Entertainer

It seems surprising that only five Performers took our survey. They are extremely social and considered the life of the party. Creative and playful, they are sure to bring joy to any D&D game. Perhaps what drives them away is that they are easily bored, poor long-term planners, and can be unfocused. But for those able to focus their attention on D&D, they are sure to be a bright light at the table.

  • 40% played Tieflings.
  • 40% are on quests of Revenge.
  • 60% have a Person vs Person conflict.

ESTP – Doer / Entrepreneur

There was only one Doer in our survey. Energetic and highly social, Doers certainly have no shortage of friends that would play D&D with them. So why only one? Doers tend to be unstructured and hate rules, even in games. They are blunt in communication and have trouble identifying emotions, which can make it difficult in emotionally-based games like D&D.

  • The 1 Doer played a female Aasimar Paladin on a quest of Understanding with a Person vs Person conflict.

Part II will be here February 7th where we look into how player gender and ethnicity impacts what their character choices are. Sneak peek: one group was 100% Warlock!